FREE SHIPPING in U.S. with $65 order! ••••••••••••••••••••••••• INTERNATIONAL SHIPPING: see info about international shipping costs under SHIPPING tab on main menu.
FREE SHIPPING in U.S. with $65 order! ••••••••••••••••••••••••• INTERNATIONAL SHIPPING: see info about international shipping costs under SHIPPING tab on main menu.
Cart 0
Moses, Lee - How Much Longer Must I Wait? Singles & Rarities 1965-1972 ["Day Trippin" RED/TRANSPARENT VINYL] - New LP
Moses, Lee - How Much Longer Must I Wait? Singles & Rarities 1965-1972 ["Day Trippin" RED/TRANSPARENT VINYL] - New LP
Moses, Lee - How Much Longer Must I Wait? Singles & Rarities 1965-1972 ["Day Trippin" RED/TRANSPARENT VINYL] - New LP
Moses, Lee - How Much Longer Must I Wait? Singles & Rarities 1965-1972 ["Day Trippin" RED/TRANSPARENT VINYL] - New LP
Future Day Recordings

Moses, Lee - How Much Longer Must I Wait? Singles & Rarities 1965-1972 ["Day Trippin" RED/TRANSPARENT VINYL] - New LP

Regular price $ 12.99 $ 0.00

Stellar collection of cuts, vocals and instrumentals, both showing the skills of this man, from his guitar chops to his deeply soulful voice, both cutting deep into the groove and deep into the innards of anybody lucky enough to listen...click off the lights and crank this one for a deep listen...Moses moving from Georgia to NYC, the sounds capture both places, especially the former, Southern soul with clarity and crunch, cooking it up with grease and flame, stunning originals and kick-ass covers, each made his own, including stirring instrumental versions of "Reach Out" and "Day Tripper," and the vocal cuts just grabbing you where it hurts, where it feels so good, the man from Atlanta pulling in the devil (sometimes dressed in drag) so close you can feel the fire on its breath, shoving the evil back and giving it the gate, slicing through the nonsense of a false life to get to the heart and soul of it all.  If this don't grab you, you might want to give up the ghost.  -- winch

 

 After reissuing his much sought-after Time and Place LP, many questions still remained, but the one asked most was, “where’s “Bad Girl”?!” Not included on his lone LP, “Bad Girl” is an undisputed Southern soul classic—arguably the song LEE MOSES’ legacy rests on. While we may never know all we wish we knew about the man behind the music, we can finally complete the picture of his work. And what tunes they are. How Much Longer Must I Wait? Singles & Rarities 1965-1972 collects all of Lee Moses’ non-album singles and B-sides, plus three never-released tracks together for the first time ever. Most of the material here pre-dates 1971’s Time and Place, reflecting his initial bid for stardom via a series of now-legendary 45s recorded with Atlanta producer JOHNNY BRANTLEY. As for the unreleased recordings—much like the man himself, little is known about them. What remains is an oeuvre that has become synonymous with raw and emotionally charged Southern soul. Essential listening for anyone with a heart.

  • The definitive collection of Lee Moses’ legendary non-album tracks available together for the first time
  • Contains three previously unreleased songs, plus the Southern soul classic "Bad Girl” (both versions)
  • Remastered audio
  • LP housed in a deluxe Kraft board jacket with insert
  • Digital mockups are not an exact representation of the colors
  • Color Vinyl Edition pressed on “Day Trippin’” Split Color wax
Vincent Lee Moses (March 13, 1941 – January 26, 1998), known as Lee Moses, was an American R&B and soul singer and guitarist. His recordings in the late 1960s as well as his 1971 LP Time and Place, are highly regarded within the deep soul genre. Life and career Lee Moses was born in Atlanta, Georgia, and attended Booker T. Washington High School. In the late 1950s he formed his first band, the Showstoppers. They became a popular live act in the Atlanta area, and were at one time the house band at the Royal Peacock club.
Moses moved to New York City in the mid-1960s, where he worked as a session musician and recorded with Johnny Brantley, who co-wrote and produced his first single, "My Adorable One", in 1965.  In 1966, he co-produced, with Johnny Brantley, several tracks by a virtually unknown Jimi Hendrix at Abtone Recording Studios in New York City. The tracks were later released as a 4-LP box set titled "The Genius of Jimi Hendrix".  In 1967, he recorded three singles – all commercially unsuccessful – for the Musicor label, including "Bad Girl," and an instrumental version of The Four Tops' "Reach Out, I'll Be There". He also recorded a version of "Dark End of the Street", issued by Gates Records (probably in 1969). Moses' guitar style has been described as "funky" and likened to that of Jimi Hendrix, a contemporary of his on the club scene of the mid-1960s. He has also been praised for his "rough and powerful deep soul singing style". In 1970, Moses released a single, "Time and Place", on the Maple label, a subsidiary of All Platinum Records. This was followed by a nine-track LP of the same name - also produced by Brantley - that included his versions of several classic songs of the period including "Hey Joe" and "California Dreaming". The album featured several members of The Ohio Players, as well as Moses' own band, the Diciples (sic). Although the album has since been described as "a revered and highly sought-after lost treasure for deep soul fans and collectors," it was a commercial failure at the time.  Moses also worked with fellow Atlanta native The Mighty Hannibal on his 1973 album, Truth. He returned to Atlanta in the early 1970s, and continued to perform locally, but did not record again. He died there from lung cancer in 1998.

 

---------------------

In New York in the ‘60s that Moses made his greatest bid to find the solo fame he desired. Moses began working there as a session player, even playing frequently with a pre-fame Jimi Hendrix, but his close relationship with producer and Atlanta native Johnny Brantley eventually saw him getting his own break via a series of 45s in 1967 – most notably with covers of Joe Simon’s “My Adorable One”, The Four Tops’ “Reach Out, I’ll Be There” and The Beatles’ “Day Tripper”.

It was 1971 before Moses’ dream of being at stage front was realized, when he released his Brantley-produced LP Time And Place for Maple Records. Recorded with a band including members of The Ohio Players and Moses’ own backing group The Deciples, it was, nonetheless, Moses himself whose star quality shone through, via his scratchy guitar riffs, his throat-ripping vocals and the stirring mood that permeates the LP’s heady mix of funk, soul and R&B.

The LP did no business, and Moses’ dream quickly crumbled. Though details on his life are scarce, it’s believed he fled New York disenchanted with the music industry, feeling he’d been double-crossed by Brantley both in credit and remuneration for the countless records he’d played on. Back in Atlanta, Moses returned to playing the clubs, married twice, and fell into depression and drug dependency. He died in 1997 at the age of 56.

Time And Place soon became a much-sought after item for collectors, and its cult has continued to grow over the years. Here, we represent it on deluxe vinyl, with brand new liner notes from Sarah Sweeney including interviews with Moses’ sister and his closest collaborator, the singer and guitarist Hermon Hitson. Through them, Moses becomes a little – but just a little – less of an enigma.


More from this collection