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Undisputed Truth, The - S/T - New LP
Gordy Records (Motown)

Undisputed Truth, The - S/T - New LP

Regular price $ 20.00 $ 0.00
The Undisputed Truth - S/T LP. Reissue of Motown LP.  Along with working with the Temptations and bringing their sounds into the era of the late 1960s and early 1970s, Whitfield also helped spearhead this group, often giving the two groups (and sometimes a third artist) the same material.  While he was there alongside both groups, providing songs, production and probably much of the same musicians, to me it seemed like a competition, between groups and maybe between Whitfield himself.  Often The Temptations got the bigger hit from the shared songs, probably because they were superior in the vocal department, and maybe also because the Whitfield/Temptations/Motown Soul Brothers musicians were so deeply Detroit, moving into sounds influenced by Sly and Hendrix but delivering something integral to their experiences and selves, the power and soul of a place, I will also have a place in my heart for the underdog, and the Undisputed Truth is part of the Motown story and this debut serves as a solid entry point.  -- winch (green noise)

 

 

    Review by Andrew Hamilton: This sparkling debut, fueled by "Smiling Faces Sometimes," a number three pop hit, zoomed to #43 on Billboard's Top 200 albums chart. Lead singer Joe Harris had recorded as a teenager with Little Joe & the Moroccos and later with the Fabulous Peps, and logged a brief, unsuccessful stint with the Ohio Players. Additionally, Brenda Joyce and Billie Rae Calvin had done background work and sung in the Delicates. Producer Norman Whitfield brought one original song to the session, "You Got the Love I Need"; every other cut was previously recorded by others (Holland-Dozier-Holland's "We Got a Way Out Love" was originally done by the Originals, and so on). Whitfield had the creative juices flowing on "Ball of Confusion," which bounces along for more than ten minutes and is true bliss; the arrangement is totally different from the Temptations blockbuster. The monster "Smiling Faces Sometimes" has a dead serious beat and some strong comments about people who show their teeth all the time. The tracks, with a couple of exceptions, follow a pattern: Harris sings lead, sounding Jerry Butler-ish, and Joyce and Calvin sweeten the tracks with their sugary, two-part harmonies. On Bob Dylan's "Like a Rolling Stone," Whitfield experiments with the trio by testing the pop/psychedelic waters, an indication of a new direction for Undisputed Truth.

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