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Sly & the Family Stone – Life [COLOR VINYL] - New LP
Sly & the Family Stone – Life [COLOR VINYL] - New LP
Sly & the Family Stone – Life [COLOR VINYL] - New LP
Sundazed Records

Sly & the Family Stone – Life [COLOR VINYL] - New LP

Regular price $ 30.00 $ 0.00

While Sly and the Family Stone were kicking it out from the get go, they also built it up quickly from really good to the apogee of amazing, with this album clearly taking a trajectory toward the top.  If this is not their strongest album, it's pretty close, and it's better than nearly every album ever recorded on this planet.  At their best, this band offered pointedly protest songs and celebratory party songs, sometimes at the same time.  This one starts off with a blast with "Dynamite," lighting the fuse with the opening electric guitar licks and getting into the hand-clapping celebration, the perfect introduction to this classic album.  This opener ends with a trail out call back to their previous album, and then launches into the finger licking "Chicken," going into a focus on poking pointed sticks at the squares, chickens, and plastic people, before launching back into full celebratory, both modes fairly bold considering the time, the targeting a bit more comical, direct, and unique than the typically protest songs of this era, and the party tunes simply bold considering the times, far from the first time music offered celebration in trying times, but clearly having some influence on the directions of music of the coming decade.   While Jimi Hendrix was almost single handedly creating and setting a standard for the hard rock of the 1970s, at the same time with songs like "Fun," Sly and the Family Stone were doing the same for 1970s hard funk.  Sure, when someone makes such sweeping claims, it's bound to open room to interject the names of other artists, but all those other names don't weaken the claims--Sly Stone's claim to fame.  The set kicks to the front of the stage from the get go and remains there for the duration.  While Hendrix was effectively stretching out the songs with Electric Ladyland in 1968, even with all the innovation, Sly and the Family Stone were keeping the songs punchy and concise, almost all the songs clocking in under the 3 minutes, and the other two clocking in under 3 1/2, songs like "I'm a Animal" weaving into designs that seem custom made for songs that stretch way past the length of the 7" single format, but Sly and the band still cut to the quick, and while so many of these  songs seem ready for extended workouts on the stage, they manage to keep it packaged tight, into sticks of dynamite.  And that word sums this up quite accurate: this is bundle of DYNAMITE!  -- winch (green noise)

 


When I party, I party hearty
Fun is on my mind
Put a smile on your face
Leave that bummer behind
Sock it unto others
As you would have them sock it to you
When I party, I party hearty
Fun is on my mind
Put a smile on your face
Leave that bummer behind

"By late 1968, the third album by Sly & the Family Stone absolutely blew the roof off the building. Life sounded so tangibly real it almost seemed like it was cut live. The title track, along with "Love City," "Plastic Jim," "Into My Own Thing" and especially "Dynamite!" signaled a perfect alliance between Sly's multi-influence, far-reaching musical vision and the burgeoning hippie ballroom community, already spreading like lawn daisies throughout the land. Never before had juicily syncopated beats dovetailed so perfectly with distortion-laced rock guitar. "You don't have to die before you live," sings Sly on "Life" and he's not kidding! The lyrical content of Sly's music becomes even more graphic with detailed workouts like "Jane Is A Groupee," a riveting description of this fascinating rock 'n' roll sub-culture. Then, on the other hand, you have the full-bore party numbers like "M'Lady" and "Fun," songs fully capable of launching anybody's weekend with reckless abandon!"


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