King, Freddy - Goes Surfin' - New LP
Sundazed Music

King, Freddy - Goes Surfin' - New LP

Regular price $ 25.00 $ 0.00

Reissue of 1963 LP. BLUE VINYL!!!

Same songs as Let's Hide Away And Dance Away With Freddy King (1961) but overdubbed crowd noise.

Artist Biography by 

Guitarist Freddie King rode to fame in the early '60s with a spate of catchy instrumentals which became instant bandstand fodder for fellow bluesmen and white rock bands alike. Employing a more down-home (thumb and finger picks) approach to the B.B. King single-string style of playing, King enjoyed success on a variety of different record labels. Furthermore, he was one of the first bluesmen to employ a racially integrated group on-stage behind him. Influenced by Eddie Taylor, Jimmy Rogers, and Robert Jr. Lockwood, King went on to influence the likes of Mick Taylor, Stevie Ray Vaughan, and Lonnie Mack, among many others.

Freddie King (who was originally billed as "Freddy" early in his career) was born and raised in Gilmer, TX, where he learned how to play guitar as a child; his mother and uncle taught him the instrument. Initially, King played rural acoustic blues, in the vein of Lightin' Hopkins. By the time he was a teenager, he had grown to love the rough, electrified sounds of Chicago blues. In 1950, when he was 16 years old, his family moved to Chicago, where he began frequenting local blues clubs, listening to musicians like Muddy Waters, Jimmy Rogers, Robert Jr. Lockwood, Little Walter, and Eddie Taylor. Soon, the young guitarist formed his own band, the Every Hour Blues Boys, and was performing himself.

In the mid-'50s, King began playing on sessions for Parrott and Chess Records, as well as playing with Earlee Payton's Blues Cats and the Little Sonny Cooper Band. Freddie King didn't cut his own record until 1957, when he recorded "Country Boy" for the small independent label El-Bee. The single failed to gain much attention.

Three years later, King signed with Federal Records, a subsidiary of King Records, and recorded his first single for the label, "You've Got to Love Her With a Feeling," in August of 1960. The single appeared the following month and became a minor hit, scraping the bottom of the pop charts in early 1961. "You've Got to Love Her With Feeling" was followed by "Hide Away," the song that would become Freddie King's signature tune and most influential recording. "Hide Away" was adapted by King and Magic Sam from a Hound Dog Taylor instrumental and named after one of the most popular bars in Chicago. The single was released as the B-side of "I Love the Woman" (his singles featured a vocal A-side and an instrumental B-side) in the fall of 1961 and it became a major hit, reaching number five on the R&B charts and number 29 on the pop charts. Throughout the '60s, "Hide Away" was one of the necessary songs blues and rock & roll bar bands across America and England had to play during their gigs.

King's first album, Freddy King Sings, appeared in 1961, and it was followed later that year by Let's Hide Away and Dance Away With Freddy King: Strictly Instrumental. Throughout 1961, he turned out a series of instrumentals -- including "San-Ho-Zay," "The Stumble," and "I'm Tore Down" -- which became blues classics; everyone from Magic Sam and Stevie Ray Vaughan to Dave Edmunds and Peter Green covered King's material. "Lonesome Whistle Blues," "San-Ho-Zay," and "I'm Tore Down" all became Top Ten R&B hits that year.

Freddie King continued to record for King Records until 1968, with a second instrumental album (Freddy King Gives You a Bonanza of Instrumentals) appearing in 1965, although none of his singles became hits. Nevertheless, his influence was heard throughout blues and rock guitarists throughout the '60s -- Eric Clapton made "Hide Away" his showcase number in 1965. King signed with Atlantic/Cotillion in late 1968, releasing Freddie King Is a Blues Masters the following year and My Feeling for the Blues in 1970; both collections were produced by King Curtis. After their release, Freddie King and Atlantic/Cotillion parted ways.

 On December 29, 1976, King died of heart failure. Although his passing was premature -- he was only 42 years old -- Freddie King's influence could still be heard in blues and rock guitarists decades after his death

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Vinyl Pressed at RTI!

Syd Nathan, impresario of Cincinatti's King Records, was the epitome of the old-school indie record label owner. Always hustling, Nathan regularly beat the odds to release hit after hit in multiple genres. He'd try anything if he thought it might work, or more precisely, if he thought it would make money. After Chess Records turned down guitarist/vocalist Freddy King several times for sounding too much like B.B, King, Nathan thought that sound might actually be sellable and took a chance, signing Freddy to his Federal subsidiary label. They hit paydirt with an instrumental titled "Hide Away," which reached #5 on the R&B Chart and #29 on the Pop Singles Chart. Encouraged by the single's success, Nathan released a full album of King's instrumentals, Let's Hide Away and Dance Away with Freddy King. (See what Nathan did there with the title, slipping in a reference to Freddy's big hit single? Always be closing, my friends, always be closing.)The album sold well and helped make Freddy a bankable touring act. While others would have been satisfied to move on to the next project, Syd sensed untapped potential in the LP. Meanwhile, several artists on the West Coast were making noise in the brand new surf music scene (and by "making noise," I mean selling records). Syd didn't have any surf music artists under contract, but he DID have Freddy King. Surely, Syd surmised, if the kid's went nuts for Dick Dale's guitar instrumental workouts, they could do the same for Freddy's. All he needed was a little marketing magic...GET A NEW COVER WITH SOME SURF KIDS! THROW SOME CROWD NOISE OVER TRACKS SO IT SOUNDS 'LIVE'! CALL IT...ERR...FREDDY KING GOES SURFIN'! PRESS IT AND HAVE IT ON THE SHELVES BY NEXT WEEK!!!!!!!

While it may not have happened EXACTLY like that, King Records did release Freddy King Goes Surfin', an album containing the very same songs (in precisely the same running order) as Let's Hide Away... with crowd noise dubbed over the music. Did the ruse work? Though it didn't sell as well as the original, Freddy King Goes Surfin' did find an audience. Like Bo Diddley Is a Gunslinger, the album's title is such a preposterous premise that it surely snagged many buyers on that fact alone. And no amount of ersatz cheering and cocktail glass tinkling could cover up the six-string genius of King and his almighty Texas tone. Need proof? Fellow Lone Star blues maven Billy F. Gibbons picked Freddy King Goes Surfin' as one of his Top Ten Favorite Blues Albums of All Time. As for Sundazed, we know not to mess with a good thing. Sourced from the original King mono masters and pressed on 180-gram vinyl at Record Technology, Inc. (RTI), we are proud to present Freddy King Goes Surfin' in its original running order with its original cover art. Somewhere, Syd is chuckling to himself, remembering the time he stole a hit right out from under the Chess brothers...

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This is energetic and playful instrumental blues which hadn't been done before, and nor has it been done by anyone in quite a unique way since. The band on this record is basically the 'studio' band of the time with the label King Records. The members are: Sonny Thompson - piano (also co-wrote most of the songs with King), Bill Willis - bass, Philip Paul - drums, Fred Jordan - rhythm guitar, Clifford Scott - sax, and Gene Redd - sax.  Sonny Thompson was already an established blues piano master in his own right, but here he's letting Mr. King shine. 

 


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