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Gories, The  - Houserockin' [IMPORT] – New LP
Gories, The  - Houserockin' [IMPORT] – New LP
Gories, The  - Houserockin' [IMPORT] – New LP
Gories, The  - Houserockin' [IMPORT] – New LP
Gories, The  - Houserockin' [IMPORT] – New LP
Gories, The  - Houserockin' [IMPORT] – New LP
Gories, The  - Houserockin' [IMPORT] – New LP
Gories, The  - Houserockin' [IMPORT] – New LP
Gories, The  - Houserockin' [IMPORT] – New LP
Crypt Records

Gories, The - Houserockin' [IMPORT] – New LP

Regular price $ 25.00 $ 0.00


Reissue.

Oh yeah! 

Originally issued in 1989 (the year Green Noise was born!) on Len Puch's Wanghead label.  Mixing that early 60s (and some late 60s Detroit) with the real beginning of Motor City maximum electric music--that early 1950s Eddie Kirkland/John Lee Hooker sound.  The Gories of course creating the sound that so many white acts still exploit today.   

 

  • Cover [Album Cover Assembly]  Big Fun Graphics, Mark Niemenski
  • Design [Album Design], Photography By  Steve Shaw (2)
  • Drums  Peggy O'Neill
  • Engineer  Len Puch
  • Lead Guitar, Vocals, Harmonica  Mick*
  • Producer, Mixed By  Len Puch, The Gories
  • Rhythm Guitar, Vocals  Dan Kroha

While the Gories mostly went unnoticed at the time, in retrospect they were big-ass dirtbombs chucked in the swimming pool of american music, splashing mud, ripples spreading out, still coloring the waters today.  So many bands rose out of this muddy water, surfaced in the wake of the Gories, a band that fueled their music with the fire inside, and the fire that was burning in their city all their lives, and the fire that was the music of 1945 - 1965, post war blues, Hooker and Kirkland, Bo Diddley and 60s garage, obscure Detroit outfits. The bands of Detroit were often seen as ahead of the times, but in many ways they were so far behind, ignoring most of everything that had been happening recently.  Detroit 1969 might have been the biggest influence on punk that ever existed, but in a way it was behind, coming out of black music and mid 60s garage, mostly ignoring all the recent fads of country rock and progressive rock, living that loud sound because it was their own, industrial and isolated by geography, poverty and racism, from places where factories ran the cities and blacks were the majority.  What the Gories and other Wanghead bands did in the 1980s was in many ways similar to what Detroit bands did in the late 60s, getting behind the wheel of an old eight banger of yesterday and charging forward like there is no tomorrow. 



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