FREE SHIPPING in U.S. with $35 order!
FREE SHIPPING in U.S. with $35 order!
Cart 0
Barton, Lou Ann - Old Enough - Used LP
Barton, Lou Ann - Old Enough - Used LP
Asylum Records

Barton, Lou Ann - Old Enough - Used LP

Regular price $ 12.00 $ 0.00

vinyl: VG+

sleeve: VG-

It's important to remember that women such as Wanda Jackson and Brenda Lee might have offered plenty of hillbilly also injected many of their songs with black music, but when I hear white girls singing black music in the 1970s, or music like this album from the early 1980s, it's hard for me to not think about Janis.  But while I have a feeling that Barton had to have a deep respect for her fellow Texan, this is definitely not like the Janis copycats that popped up in the wake of Joplin.  It's perhaps good that some time had passed between these two artists, because while like Janis, Barton is clearly a white girl singing black music with conviction, this comes out of many southern settings, namely Texas, Memphis, and Muscle Shoals--where it's recorded.  The set has plenty of focus of old compositions by legends such as Hank Ballard (Detroit) and Allen Toussaint (New Orleans), but also has some newer compositions, two by Frankie Miller (Scotland) who had also recorded in Muscle Shoals, and the inclusion of a Marshall Crenshaw song helps bring this into the present, but of course this was a present that was looking back, and Barton takes the Crenshaw songs all the way back to Wanda Jackson.  With this might also be seen as influenced by the 1978 rock n roll album by hillbilly's teen queen Tanya Tucker and the Stiff Record releases by Akron's teen queen Rachel Sweet, that's likely wrong, as Barton was an elder to those two, and her music clearly comes from two places--from the black music of the previous decades of the postwar years (even if that was fed through more current songwriters), and from her own innards.  This stands as a reminder that if you are a white girl doing black music, you better leave the pretending and apologies behind, you had better not try to force it (man, I hate that) but still get down to business and deliver the goods. -- winch (green noise)   

I'm Old Enough Written-By – Frankie Miller 3:58 A2 Brand New Lover Written-By – Marshall Crenshaw 2:26 A3 It's Raining Saxophone, Soloist – Al Garth Written-By – Naomi Neville 2:51 A4 It Ain't Right Written-By – Walter Jacobs 3:30 A5 Finger Poppin' Time Backing Vocals – The Flemtones Tenor Saxophone, Soloist – Greg Piccolo Written-By – Hank Ballard 3:15 B1 Stop These Teardrops Saxophone, Soloist – Al Garth Written-By – Lavell White 4:08 B2 The Sudden Stop Written-By – Bobby Russell 3:33 B3 The Doodle Song Written-By – Frankie Miller 2:51 B4 Maybe Written-By – Richard Barrett (5) 3:04 B5 Every Day Of The Week Written-By – Ted Jarrett 2:38 Phonographic Copyright ℗ – Elektra/Asylum Records Phonographic Copyright ℗ – WEA International Inc. Copyright © – Elektra/Asylum Records Copyright © – WEA International Inc. Recorded At – Muscle Shoals Sound Studios Lacquer Cut at – Sterling Sound Mastered At – Sheffield Lab Matrix – △913 Mastered At – Europadisk Pressed By – Allied Record Company – B-16128 Pressed By – Allied Record Company – B-16129 Manufactured By – Elektra/Asylum/Nonesuch Records Record Company – Warner Communications Inc. Art Direction, Design – Jeff Adamoff Backing Vocals – Ava Aldridge, Cindy Richardson, Eddie Struzick, Lenny LeBlanc, Lou Ann Barton Baritone Saxophone – Ronnie Eades* Bass – David Hood Drums – Roger Hawkins Engineer [Additional Engineering] – Mary Beth McLemore Engineer, Mixed By – Steve Melton Guitar – Duncan Cameron, Jimmie Vaughan, Jimmy Johnson (4), Wayne "Night Train" Perkins* Guitar, Backing Vocals – Glenn Frey Horns – Muscle Shoals Horns Keyboards – Barry Beckett, Clayton Ivey Percussion – Tom Roady Photography By – Jim Shea Producer – Glenn Frey, Jerry Wexler Tenor Saxophone – Harvey Thompson, Walter King Trombone – Charlie Rose* Trumpet, Arranged By [Horns] – Harrison Calloway

 



More from this collection