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Century Palm - Meet You - New LP
Deranged Records

Century Palm - Meet You - New LP

Regular price $ 13.00 $ 0.00

New.  Black vinyl. 


 

Made up of active members of Toronto, Canada's indie rock scene, Century Palm makes its full-length debut with Meet You, which introduces the project's brooding, dance-prompting synth pop. Fans of a certain age or persuasion will recognize the influence of post-punks like Joy Division and Wire, as well as more new wave-leaning outfits such as Devo. The latter can be heard on tracks like the spry, staccato opener, "Reset Reaction," while the former is more apparent on songs like "Another You" and "King of John St.," which was inspired by moving to Toronto from smaller towns and feeling lost in its height, history, and population. Somewhat contrasting, "Sick of It" is a guitar-heavy tune that features a talky, Iggy Pop-type vocal delivery ("Who do you think you are coming around here with your feelings...I'm sick of it, yeah"). The snare pounds out each beat of the song under rambling guitars, marching synths, and saxophone. The closer, "Desire," is a different recording of a tune that appeared on a split EP with Feel Alright six months prior to the album's release. With an overall lush design and simple hooks, Meet You is immersed in sounds of the late '70s and early '80s rather than borrowing from them, so recommended for the post-punks amongst us."

Century Palm are Paul Lawton (Ketamines), Andrew Payne (Zebrassieres), Penny Clark (Tough Age) and Jesse Locke (Dirty Beaches). Their debut album, Meet You, was recorded by the band in Toronto, mixed in Vancouver by Jay Arner and mastered in Australia by Mikey Young. Meet You is 10 songs about getting to know another layer of yourself – even when you think you know yourself. About subtle tones of despair. About the things you aren't encouraged to express on an everyday basis. Musically, Century Palm crib shamelessly from Wire, Neu!, and Eno-era Roxy Music, modern Australian bands like Total Control, and failed experiments from earlier, abandoned projects. Synths ruining perfectly nice pop songs.


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