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Alexandre – Let it Out – Used LP
Alexandre – Let it Out – Used LP
Alexandre – Let it Out – Used LP
Celebration Records

Alexandre – Let it Out – Used LP

Regular price $ 5.00 $ 0.00

VG.  Minor wear to record, ugly punch hole in top right corner.

Through the 1970s, there were many Canadian bands who were unknown to most Americans, but I'm guessing had some success at home...likely backed up the big outfits when they came to town, and even sometimes backed up bands in Michigan concerts of the 1970s where I witnessed them and gained some appreciation...the bands had many things in common with each other and I coined it Canadian rock, somewhat similar to the post-Beatles UK bands of the 1970s (who clearly came out of the Beatles but didn't really sound like them), sometimes seeming like a much lesser version of Alex Harvey from Scotland...for the rest of the world, they were probably too late for glam and sometimes too early for new wave...and their albums were never great...but they usually had some entertainment value and a few semi-enjoyable cuts with unique elements like the oddball or throwback lyrics or very mildly progressive pop-rock instrumentations...they often seemed to take themselves quite seriously and then again not at all, always had this bubblegum clownish juvenile feel to them...like a 23 year old who had gone to a year of college but always wanted to be a teenager again...anyway, the sound carried into the early 1980s and this album could be seen as an extension that style, that sound carried through the eras of new wave and disco, songs about getting it on alongside numbers with more odd subject matter, the opener "Making Out On a Friday Night" with a new wavey synthesizer-heavy disco sound that carries through much of the set, the "Rocket Man" theme in "I Need Love" helping point out the Elton John and Bowie influence (but while I thought Taupin and Bowie were really talking about space, or if not then about feeling alienation in the human race, the song on this album might just be another song about drugs).  There's nothing great in this heavily produced album, and there's some truly awful material where it seems clear he listened to way too much Steely Dan before dropping out of college, but it might be a unique enough take on 80s pop rock to appeal to some fans of Canadian rock.

All the music is by Alexandre (Stanké), the lyrics mostly by Jean-Pierre Cousineau.


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