Deodato - Prelude - Used LP
CTI Records

Deodato - Prelude - Used LP

Regular price $ 10.00 $ 0.00

Used.  VG+  Quadraphonic.  gatefold. 

 

 

To get the quadraphonic experience, you need quad equipment.  If you have that, this is likely worth grabbing.  Plays just fine on regular stereo equipment where it just sounds like any old stereo records, far as I know (but I don't know much about all this audiophile junk).  

Eumir Deodato

Opening with the classic funked-up version of the theme from 2001 (actually of course a classical piece by Strauss)...signature Creed Taylor early 70s productions, drive and reflection, usually focused on a driving rhythm but the drive filled with stirring mix of countless sounds--strings, horns, and electric instruments, the inclusion of classical pieces showing how this sound was a fusion of funk and classical, the soundtrack element showing how soundtracks clearly had an influence on Creed Taylor, the set closing with a funky number, a fusion of rock, Brazil and jazz...the bottom held down tight with the bass of both Stanley Clarke (electric) and Ron Carter (acoustic) as well as percussionists Airto and Ray Barretto (both fellow Brazilian artists), drummer Billy Cobham, and both Deodato's electric piano and John Tropea's electric guitar helping to deepen the groove. Perhaps most importantly, even with all this talent and even solos, the contributions are all part of the one thing and never given the chance to simply show off for the sake of showing off their talent (except a bit with the guitarists), an ideal that was brought to the forefront of the conversation by punk, but this was 1972 and Taylor seemed to understand the importance of this long before others caught on, perhaps something he picked up from listening to soundtrack work.  Sandwiched between the opener and closer, the band is mostly in a more reflective mode, incorporating the Brazil roots to explore classical music, as well as the pop music and movie songs from this era.  A few times, this sounds dated and breezy, but never gives the listener a reason to lift the needle, elements Deodato's electric piano helping to move the music along...while this works good as background music while cleaning the crib or wrestling your girlfriend(s), like so many of Creed Taylor's seminal offerings, this deserves a full-album lights-out headphones-on treatment. - winch (green noise records)

 

AllMusic Review by 

"Prior to Prelude, Eumir Deodato was primarily known as a tasteful, lyrical, bossa nova and samba-based sometime arranger for Antonio Carlos Jobim, Frank Sinatra, Wes Montgomery, and others. Enter Creed Taylor, who gave Deodato a chance to step out on his own as a pianist/leader, doing a few tunes of his own plus a healthy quota of CTI-patented jazz interpretations of classical pieces by Richard Strauss ("Also Sprach Zarathustra (2001)"), Debussy ("Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun"), and bowdlerized Borodin ("Baubles, Bangles and Beads"). Well, "2001" -- a clever, up-tempo Latin-groove takeoff on the opening measures of Strauss' tone poem suddenly exploded and became an improbable hit single. In its wake, Prelude soared to number three on the pop LP charts, and Deodato was propelled out of the arranger-for-hire business. Though overshadowed by "2001," the other tracks also hold up well today, being mostly medium-tempo, sometimes lushly orchestrated, conga-accented affairs that provide velvety showcases for Deodato's lyrical electric piano solos. The record also made a temporary star out of John Tropea, whose electric guitar has a lot of rock & rolling zip and fire, and Hubert Laws, Stanley Clarke, and Marvin Stamm each get a little solo room too. This would be the biggest hit Deodato and CTI ever had, and though short on playing time (32 minutes), it still makes enjoyable listening."

 


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